Angoli d’Italia

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Ladolcevitaly continua la sua carrellata di immagini d’Italia su Loscrivodame. Oggi faremo un piccolo viaggio con testo in lingua inglese riportato da Instagram..in attesa di proseguire il nostro viaggio con Loscrivodame per i borghi di tutta Italia.

Ecco alcuni angoli suggestivi di alcune città italiane che lasciano a bocca aperta..Fede

14719075_1859963017573142_3643803975653785600_nBergamo Alta

Also known as the oldest town in northen Italy, Padova is a wonderful medieval city-state, home to Italy’s second-oldest university (one of Europe’s oldest, from 1222), the Scrovegni Chapel with Giotto’s famed 14th century frescos and the magnificent Prato della Valle, a 950,000-square-foot elliptical square, is thought to be Europe’s second-biggest.

 

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Milano

Piazza Cordusio is a square in central Milan, Italy. The square takes its name from the Cors Ducis (Ducal court) which was found in the square during Longobard times.It is well known for its several turn-of-the-19th-century Neoclassical, eclectic and Art Nouveau buildings, banks and post offices. Even though many of these have now relocated elsewhere, it is still an important commercial square in the city.

 

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Genova

Porta Soprana is located in the east side of Genova, a city situated in Liguria region.
It was built up in 1155 after that Genoese inhabitant, worried about an attack from Frederick Barbarossa, decided to build up a circuit of walls that enclosed most of the city.
Once you pass this door, you can see the beautiful ancient buildings of the city center of Genova. On the left tower that frame Porta Soprana’s access arch you can see a plaque that, among other things, it states: “If you bring peace, you can touch these doors, but if you seek war, sand and beat you shall retrieve”.

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Napoli

The Fontana del Gigante is a stunning monumental fountain situated in Naples, southern Italy. It was designed in the 17th century by Michelangelo Naccherino and Pietro Bernini for the Royal Palace of Naples, where it stood near a colossal ancient statue, and thereby gained its name. From there it was moved to the site of Palace of the Immacolatella, but in 1905, it was moved to it present pictoresque site, on via Partenope, near the Castel dell’Ovo. It is also called the Fontana dell’Immacolatella.

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Bologna

The two Towers of Bologna, precisely the Asinelli Tower (97 m) and the Garisenda Tower (48 m), are the most prominent medieval towers of Bologna, which represent the landmark fo the city. Between the 12th and the 13th century, the number of towers in the city was very high, possibly up to 180. The reasons for the construction of so many towers are not clear. One hypothesis is that the richest families used them for offensive/defensive purposes during the period of the Investiture Controversy. During the 13th century, many towers were taken down or demolished, and others simply collapsed. Many towers have subsequently been utilized in one way or the other: as prison, city tower, shop or residential building.
Nowadays only less then 20 still exist, including the two towers.

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Firenze

Located in Florence, in Tuscany region, Santa Maria Novella is a wonderful church that was begun in 1246 and completed in 1360.
But the famous green-and-white marble facade—though it looks like a single, felicitous example of architecture—was actually built in two eras and two very different styles.
This Florentine church puts painting in perspective—literally, as home to some of the most groundbreaking frescoes of the early Renaissance. Inside, between the many famous paintings, you can find the Masaccio’s 1428 fresco of the Trinity. Furthermore, near the Trinity is a 15th-century pulpit designed by Brunelleschi, most famous for being the spot from which Galileo was denounced for his heretical theory that the Earth revolved around the sun.

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Padova

Also known as the oldest town in northen Italy, Padova is a wonderful medieval city-state, home to Italy’s second-oldest university (one of Europe’s oldest, from 1222), the Scrovegni Chapel with Giotto’s famed 14th century frescos and the magnificent Prato della Valle, a 950,000-square-foot elliptical square, is thought to be Europe’s second-biggest.

 

Roma

Aheady mix of haunting sights,awe-inspiring art and vibrant street life,Rome is the Italy’s Eternal City is one of the world’s most beautiful and inspiring capitals, due to the incalculable immensity of its archaeological and art treasures,as well as for the charm of its unique traditions,the beauty of its panoramic views,and the majesty of its magnificent “villas” (parks). –

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The Monumento Nazionale a Vittorio Emanuele II is an imposing structure located in the Piazza Venezia. It was inaugurated in 1911 to yield homage to Victor Emmanuel II, the first king of Italy after its unification. Since 1921, the Victor Emmanuel Monument holds the tomb of the unknown soldier, a place in which the eternal flame shines and which is always guarded by two soldiers.
The colossal monument, which is 135 meters wide and 70 meters high, is comprised of scores of majestic Corinthian columns and endless stairs, all carved in white marble. The top is crowned with an equestrian sculpture of Victor Emmanuel cast in bronze and two chariots driven by the goddess Victoria.

14727403_204088703382222_1476469766200754176_n1Verona

Arena di Verona is a Roman Amphitheatre located in Verona, Veneto region, norheastern Italy.
After the Colosseum in Rome and the amphitheatre in Capua, the Roman arena in Verona is the third largest Roman amphitheater.
The arena in Verona was built in the 1st century AD by the Flavian emperors according to the principle of “bread and games”.
For almost 400 years gladiators fought here and entertained the masses with bloody carnage. When emperor Honorius prohibited the gladiator games in 404 AD, that was the end of the Arena of Verona and the amphitheatre stood empty for centuries. With its gigantic dimensions of 140 metres in length and 110 metres in width it dominates the Piazza Brà from the north. Its great acoustics and unique location make the Roman arena the ideal location for events and it attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors to Verona every year during the Festival season to see the opera and theatre performances.